Why Til Hazel Has ‘Serious Concerns’ About Tysons

From Bisnow: Northern Virginia real estate legend Til Hazel, who has memories of the Tysons area dating back to World War II and has been instrumental in its development ever since, sees some major challenges facing Tysons’ economy and transportation network. “I wish I could say things about Tysons that were upbeat and optimistic, but I

For government contractors, no end in sight to budget uncertainty

From The Washington Post: For most in Washington, last week’s short-lived government shutdown seemed to be mostly an annoyance, causing little more disruption than a passing snowstorm. For federal contractors, though, the stoppage brought fresh worries that the industry’s funding problems are likely to get worse before they get better. Congress remedied the shutdown not with

Schar School Stat: Education & Health Services Jobs

This piece ran in the Washington Business Journal in the Jan. 26, 2018 edition. The graphic was prepared by the Washington Business Journal using data supplied by the Institute. During 2017, the Education & Health Services sector added 13,000 jobs, the third largest gain of all sectors behind Professional & Business Services and Leisure & Hospitality. Gains

How Amazon could impact DC-area schools, housing and transportation

From WTOP: That’s what the D.C. region’s leaders have been saying about the possibility that Amazon could locate its second headquarters here, bringing with it 50,000 high-paying jobs that could fuel the region’s economy for decades to come. The possibility is intoxicating. But what if the online retail giant/tech juggernaut actually moved here to the nation’s capital —

Guest Post: Three Workforce-Based Reasons Why Amazon Should Locate HQ2 in the Washington Region

Amazon is considering three jurisdictions in the Washington region for its second headquarters (HQ2): the District of Columbia, Montgomery County, MD, and Northern Virginia, which included proposals from the city of Alexandria, and the counties of Arlington, Fairfax and Loudoun. Amazon’s decision will be a pragmatic one of matching its needs and preferences with the metropolitan area’s labor force, its infrastructure, its culture, and the attractiveness of the incentives the jurisdiction offers. Most bidders will accordingly seek to highlight their highly educated STEM workforce, their university system, their subways, highways, and airports, as well as their quality-of-life, and their culture of entrepreneurialism. Yet, the question of how well matched these features of an economy are to Amazon’s business activity, rather than any average technology-oriented company requires a more nuanced discussion.