Real Per Capita Personal Income & Regional Price Levels: 2008-2016

After adjusting for regional price levels, the per capita personal income in the Washington region was $56,670 in 2016. Of the 15 largest metros, the Washington region had the fourth highest real PCPI. The region’s real PCPI increased 1.4 percent from 2015 but has increased a total of 2.7 percent since 2008, underperforming all other large metros except Houston.

JBG Smith just launched a workforce housing initiative. It may have HQ2 in mind.

From The Washington Business Journal: JBG Smith Properties announced Wednesday that it will launch an initiative to preserve or build between 2,000 and 3,000 “affordable workforce” housing units in the D.C. region over the next decade. It’s a sign that the private sector is stepping up efforts to provide less expensive housing in a region that remains one

Region’s economy continues to grow as housing prices rise

From The Frederick News-Post: The Washington, D.C., region is doing well economically, although much of the growth is in Virginia, while home prices around the region continue to rise. A report released in late April by George Mason University’s Stephen S. Fuller Institute found that economic indicators suggest that the Washington region’s economic growth should continue

Earnings Without a Salary: Trends in Proprietors’ Income in the Washington Region

People in the Washington region are working in increasingly diverse ways, but how do these new ways of working affect regional prosperity? A new report from The Stephen S. Fuller Institute and Business Development Advisors considers proprietors’ income to learn more about the dollar value of work in the Washington region that does not involve wage and salary employment. The report shows that nonfarm proprietors’ income makes a substantial and growing contribution to the regional economy.

Transforming Tysons

Will it become America’s next great city? From Virginia Business: In 1950, Tysons Corner was little more than a mom-and-pop general store at the intersection of state Routes 7 and 123 surrounded by farms with peach orchards and wheat fields. By 2050, a rechristened Tysons is expected to be a bustling, cosmopolitan metropolis of more than