What Does Amazon’s HQ2 Mean for the Washington Region’s Economy?

Amazon’s second headquarters (HQ2) is expected to bring up to 50,000 jobs and occupy 8 million square feet (SF) of office space in Arlington County, VA. The build-out is likely to occur over 20 years. The arrival of HQ2 in the Arlington County will have economic, fiscal and housing impacts on the County, the Washington region and the Commonwealth of Virginia. This report primarily focuses on the broader impacts on the Washington region. For a detailed analysis on the impacts on Arlington County, VA and the Commonwealth of Virginia, see The Economic and Fiscal Impacts of Locating Amazon’s HQ2 in Arlington County, Virginia.

Hogan promised fiscal prudence and economic turnaround. Has he delivered?

From The Washington Post: Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan’s pocketbook-themed pitch in 2014 rested on three central promises: Roll back tax and fee increases, create new jobs, and cut wasteful government spending. Four years later, Hogan has delivered some of what he pledged, and he is touting those accomplishments as he seeks to become only the second

Amazon HQ2 Watch: Northern Virginia Checks the Most Boxes

From The New York Times: Amazon won’t say a word about where it plans to put its much-hyped second headquarters. Officials in the 20 cities and regions named as finalists say that they don’t know anything — and that even if they did, they wouldn’t share it publicly. But that hasn’t stopped investors, economic officials and

Here’s Why the Fate of TPS Has Such Major Implications for DC

From The Washingtonian: The policy could have a huge impact on the Salvadoran community—and Washington as a whole. On Wednesday, October 3,  Xiomara Cruz, a 48-year-old housekeeper, was screaming and jumping for joy in her Silver Spring house. “‘What’s going on? Why are you screaming? Are you OK?’ my son and my mother asked when they heard

Real estate icon Til Hazel: Metro is ‘a political failure’

From The Washington Business Journal: One of the people most responsible for developing Fairfax County and Northern Virginia is not thrilled with the current state of Metro. “You’ve got a problem with Metro today. Metro is a political failure,” said attorney and local real estate development icon John “Til” Hazel. Hazel, 87, played a substantial role in