Federal Procurement Spending in the Washington Region: 2008 – 2016

Federal procurement spending in the Washington region from 2008 to 2016 was marked by three major trends. The first major trend was the decline in federal procurement spending following its peak in 2010 after thirty years of growth. The second trend was a decrease in the concentration of federal procurement dollars by agency and sub-state portion of the Washington region that was primarily the result of large spending decline by DoD. The third trend was the homogenization of purchases by the federal government with fewer categories of products and services accounting for a greater percentage of annual procurement spending. Overall, these trends point to the region’s economy being less dependent on which agency is doing the procurement and more dependent on what products and services are being purchased. Still, the key variable remains the total value of federal procurement contracting as this is a critical determinant of the Washington region’s future economic vitality.

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Roadmap Update: Comparative Performance of Regional and National Clusters: March 2014 – March 2016

How have the region’s advanced industrial clusters performed since The Sequester? Has the performance of the region’s seven non-federally dependent clusters resulted in reducing the region’s economic dependence on the federal government thereby reducing its vulnerability to possible future reductions in federal spending? In the two years since The Sequester (March 2014-March 2016), jobs in these clusters grew by 1.9 percent substantially lagging the growth of non-cluster jobs in the region and the performance of their respective clusters nationally.

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Demographic Change in the Washington Region: 1990-2015

The Washington region gained residents faster than the nation and all but five of the 15 largest employment metros between 1990 and 2015. The age distribution of residents in the region shifted over this period and the region had a higher proportion of older residents in 2015 compared to 1990. The region became majority-minority in 2008 and continued to diversify in the next seven years. This report details the changing composition of the Washington Region and how it compares to both the nation and the 15 largest employment metros.

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The Impact of the Torpedo Factory Art Center on the Economy of the City of Alexandria

The research presented in this report confirms the findings of other research on the economic impacts of the Torpedo Factory Art Center; that is, the Torpedo Factory is the most cited major attraction of visitors to Old Town, 83% of its visitors are nonresidents of Alexandria, its visitors combine their trip to the Torpedo Factory with multiple visits to other Old Town attractions, and visitors attracted to Old Town by the Torpedo Factory spend on average $92.88 during their visit including purchases at the Art Center.

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Assessing the Roadmap and the Region’s Economic Pivot

The Washington region has long depended on increased spending by the Federal Government for its economic growth. This report summarizes this history and provides an update on the region’s growth in 2014 through 2016.

The Roadmap for the Washington Region’s Future Economy, released in January 2016, identified seven advanced industrial clusters for which the region possessed a competitive advantage that were not federally dependent. Over the 2014 to 2016 period, job growth was strong. While the gains were not driven by increases in the Federal Government, they were also not driven by these advanced industries. Rather, the growth occurred in non-cluster based jobs, the majority of which are local serving. Overall, there is little evidence that the Washington economy has pivoted away from its historic dependence on federal spending to grow in the long run.

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The Roadmap

At the start of 2015, Dr. Fuller warned regional leaders that Greater Washington was at risk of falling behind other major metropolitan regional economies if there was not an increase in regional cooperation and a decrease in the region’s reliance on federal funding. Heeding his call for action, the 2030 Group and a strong cross-sector coalition of regional leaders came together to support The Roadmap for the Washington Region’s Future Economy.

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Improving the Washington Region’s Global Competitiveness

The Washington metro area faces a new imperative: it must activate the private side of its economy. Doing so will likely mean increasing the region’s competitiveness in the global economy, as the domestic economy is simply not expected to grow at a very strong rate in the near future.

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