Here’s Why the Fate of TPS Has Such Major Implications for DC

From The Washingtonian: The policy could have a huge impact on the Salvadoran community—and Washington as a whole. On Wednesday, October 3,  Xiomara Cruz, a 48-year-old housekeeper, was screaming and jumping for joy in her Silver Spring house. “‘What’s going on? Why are you screaming? Are you OK?’ my son and my mother asked when they heard

Real estate icon Til Hazel: Metro is ‘a political failure’

From The Washington Business Journal: One of the people most responsible for developing Fairfax County and Northern Virginia is not thrilled with the current state of Metro. “You’ve got a problem with Metro today. Metro is a political failure,” said attorney and local real estate development icon John “Til” Hazel. Hazel, 87, played a substantial role in

Competition and Challenges Ahead for Tysons

From Tysons Reporter: It’s no secret that Tysons is growing. The skyline is filled with construction cranes and seemingly every week there’s an announcement of a new restaurant or business moving into the area. But as Tysons grows, it also faces infrastructure challenges and threats from neighbors. Professor Stephen Fuller, Professor of Public Policy at George

D.C. area job market churns along despite federal drawdown

From The Washington Post: The D.C. area economy generated 64,900 new jobs in the one-year period ended in August, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Friday, capping off a strong summer for the local job market. The number of federal jobs across the region dropped, however, while the category that includes federal contractors saw the largest

Household incomes in the District rise dramatically in 2017

From The Washington Post: Just a year after sluggish household income reports in the District of Columbia prompted speculation that the city’s boom years were ending, new numbers from the Census Bureau released Thursday suggest District household income has swung dramatically back up. Median household income for the city in 2017 was $82,372, 9.1 percent higher than in