Gig and Independent Work in the Washington Region’s Economy

By Ellen Harpel, President, Business Development Advisors Download the full report as a PDF>> The gig economy and independent work arrangements receive much national attention, but their role in regional economies is not well understood. In this report we describe national level research on the evolving ways work is performed and present several measures of gig and independent

Schar School Stat: Gross Regional Product 2017

This piece ran in the Washington Business Journal in the September 21, 2018 edition. The graphic was prepared by the Washington Business Journal using data supplied by the Institute. The Washington region’s gross regional product (GRP) increased 2.1 percent in 2017. Of all 382 metros, our region ranked 151st in terms of growth. Of the largest 15

Automation in the Washington Region

Guest Post by Lokesh Dani, Graduate Research Assistant and doctoral candidate at the Schar School of Policy and Government, GMU Download as a PDF>> Automation is seen as a big challenge for society generally and the labor market specifically. Yet, we do not have a full understanding of how automation is changing the labor market and debate

Schar School Stat: Existing Home Sales Decreased in June

This piece ran in the Washington Business Journal in the June 13, 2018 edition. The graphic was prepared by the Washington Business Journal using data supplied by the Institute. Between June 2017 and June 2018, the number of existing home sales in the Washington region decreased 4.6 percent (466 sales). The number of closed sales has now

Demographic Factors Affecting the Upcoming Home Sales Market

The housing market is responsive to both economic and demographic factors. Since the Recession, economic factors have played the largest role in the Washington region. In upcoming years, however, demographic trends will put new pressures on the housing market. As Baby Boomers (54 to 72 year olds) move into their next phase of life, many home owners in this generation may wish to sell and either downsize or move. Because this generation owns about 40 percent of all homes owned in the Washington region, even a modest change in preferences could have an out-sized effect on the housing market. The increased inventory that would result from even a modest “Baby Boomer sell-off,” combined with rising interest rates and high levels of student debt among potential buyers, has the potential to moderate sales prices.