Demographic Change in the Washington Region: 2015-2016

Download as a PDF› In 2016, the number of residents in the Washington region increased by 53,508 people (+0.9%) from 2015. Population growth during this time was driven primarily by residents over 65 years old, mirroring national patterns. However, despite national gains, there were fewer 25-34 year olds in the Washington region in 2016 compared

Income and Cost of Living in the Washington Region

Download as a PDF› The real per capita personal income (PCPI) measures wealth, the cost of living [i] and inflation by metro area. It allows for more comprehensive comparisons, both over time and between geographies, by accounting for regional cost of living and changes in price levels. Compared to 2008, the Washington region’s real PCPI was

Regional Job Growth in April 2017

Download as a PDF› Between April 2016 and April 2017, the Washington region added 38,000 jobs, the smallest increase for the region since December 2014. The slowdown in growth was a result of weaker private sector gains and mirrors the pattern from the second half of 2016. Gains during the first half of 2016 were

The Washington Region’s Jobs Forecasts: 2017-2021

By Stephen S. Fuller, Ph.D. Download as a PDF› Recent reports have shown that the Washington region’s economy has underperformed its growth potentials over the past two years with these slower growth trends dating back to 2010. These trends include declining population growth (2.1% in 2010 down to 0.9% in 2016) and lagging economic growth

Once a Company Town?

By Stephen S. Fuller, Ph.D. Download as a PDF› At $500 billion, the Washington region’s economy ranked 5th in size in 2016 among the nation’s metropolitan areas. While this economic scale would seem sufficient to protect the region from the downdraft from reduced federal spending this may not be the case. Recent history confirmed the